Land Affairs

The IFP believes that the issues surrounding land affairs need to be discussed in view of the outdated and unworkable continued existence of the centralised Department of Land Affairs.

Land reform in KwaZulu-Natal

The needs of landless communities in KwaZulu-Natal must be addressed.

The land of traditional communities should be seen as already perfectly allocated and should not be part of the land programmes aimed at redistribution and restitution.

Property law

Three types of property ownership are identifiable, although only two have been recognised under the Roman-Dutch law foisted upon South Africa by colonialism. Private, public and communal property should now all gain recognition, not only in terms of indigenous and customary law, but also in terms of legislation ensuing from national government.

Provincial competence

Land Affairs, by virtue of its very meaning, is a provincial rather than a central concern. The IFP believes that there should be a constitutional amendment to allow for provinces to establish diverse systems of social management to act as a buffer to the intrinsically volatile situation arising where land issues are concerned. Levelling down of provincial frameworks to uniformity remains detrimental to reform and conflict resolution.